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March 27, 2013
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Paleo-Colours: Anchiornis by PaleoAeolos Paleo-Colours: Anchiornis by PaleoAeolos
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:iconyemayema:
YemaYema Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013  Professional General Artist
Looks cool! I like the pose!
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:iconemilherran:
EmilHerran Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2013
Looks really nice, except for one thing. The hand is folded too far back toward the fore arm.In modern day birds, the hand can fold back toward the fore arm at a 53 degree angle. In Troodontids and Dromaeosaurs, the hand could only be folded back at a 100 degree angle. The folding you have illustrated is much more similar to that in oviraptorosaurs, which is interesting because their hands could fold farther back than modern day birds. Anyway, it is a small problem. It still looks great! You have earned this fav!
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:iconyemayema:
YemaYema Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013  Professional General Artist
Hey, that was interesting to read! Thanks for commenting!
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:iconemilherran:
EmilHerran Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013
You're welcome!
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:iconskyvalr:
skyvalr Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Hm, it could be facing us and foreshortened?
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:iconemilherran:
EmilHerran Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2013
Great point, although... that is not necessarily true, the lack of depth suggests otherwise. If the arm were coming toward the viewer, the feathers would not be seen in profile. The feathers would be coming at us, so we would mostly see the feathers rather than the arm.If the arm were foreshortened, the angle displayed above would not be present. The angle of the hand suggests that it folds at 53 degrees(in profile), roughly the same as modern birds. If the hand was to be folded to that extent and foreshortened, we would see the hand and the base of the feathers. We would see the feathers large at the base and small at the tip. If the hand was folded at a 100 degree angle, as in troodontids, we would see the feathers large at the tip and smaller at the base. However if it were foreshortened, the angle would have to be even sharper than 53 degrees because their is no foreshortening in the fingers. If the fingers were coming towards us we would expect to see the fingers large at the base and short at the tip or large at the tip and small at the base. Both the hands and the feathers however are drawn in profile. Because of that, if the arm were to be stretched towards us, it would still have to fold at a very sharp angle.
I am sure by now I have sufficiently confused you. I always over explain things.
Essentially what I am saying is: foreshortening or not, the hand would still have to be bent at a very sharp angle to achieve what the hand is showing in the illustration.


[link]
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:iconemilherran:
EmilHerran Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2013
Still a great illustration though!
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:iconemilherran:
EmilHerran Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2013
As you will see in the article in the link I provide. I am basing the angles on studies of a small number of dromaeosaurid and troodontids species. The conclusion reached for these species may or may not be the standard for the entire clade. Without extensive study of the bones of Anchiornis, we cannot be certain that the measurements were the similar as in the previously studied species. However, the studies do show that it was likely that many Deinonychosaurs could only fold there hands back 100 degrees, roughly. Again, the studies were done on a small group of species, the degree of folding may or may not be the same in other Deinonychosaurs.


Reference material: [link]
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:iconemilherran:
EmilHerran Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2013
Here is a link to the information, it also looks at the hands of other theropods, pretty interesting.
[link]
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:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2013  Hobbyist
Quedó muy elegante :)
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